Construction jobs one of the most dangerous for teens

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Construction jobs one of the most dangerous for teens

Construction jobs one of the most dangerous for teens

In 2003, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health reported that despite only employing 3 percent of youth workers, construction was the third leading cause of death for young workers—responsible for 14 percent of all occupational deaths to youth under 18.

Summertime means a few things: schools out, warmer weather, and high school, college students and teens will be on the job hunt.

Lots of times, a summer job for teens means financial freedom to do what they want on weekends, save up for a car or college and they’ll take whatever job they can get their hands on, including dangerous jobs like construction and roofing.

According to a report by the National Consumers League, construction and roofing, or any kind of height work, is the second most dangerous job for 2012, second to agriculture: harvesting crops and using machinery.

The dangers of working construction are easy: they use equipment that could be deadly, like saws and nail guns, contact with electric current and traffic incidents, and inexperience. But the height in which construction workers labor at is the most dangerous, regardless of age. A fall from two-stories high could kill someone.

Here’s what the NCL report had to say:

“According to Bureau of Labor Statistics fatality records, construction and roofing are two of the ten most dangerous jobs in America. In 2007, an estimated 372,000 workers of all ages were injured in construction accidents and construction led other industries in the number of deaths among all workers: 1,178. A construction worker is nearly three times as likely to die from a work accident as the average American worker.”

 NCL also reported a 2003 release that said despite only 3 percent of teens working on construction sites construction was the third leading cause of death for young workers—responsible for 14 percent of all occupational deaths to youth under 18.

 Federal law does prohibits children under 16 to work on construction sites and some laws prohibit some minors to work on roofs, but they are allowed to work on scaffolding, trees and ladders.  

The number of deaths and injuries is decreasing, but, the dangers are still obvious. If the dangers are there for adults, they’re certainly present for teens.

By | 2012-07-06T15:40:17+00:00 July 6th, 2012|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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